Karen Lawley | Revere Real Estate, Malden Real Estate, Lynn Real Estate, Boston Real Estate


A successful home selling experience is not a guarantee. However, if you prepare for the house selling journey, you may be better equipped than others to reap the benefits of a quick, profitable home selling experience.

Now, let's take a look at three tips so you can set yourself up to succeed during the house selling journey.

1. Identify Your Home's Strengths and Weaknesses

Your home has served you well for many years, yet your residence still has flaws. Fortunately, if you allocate time and resources to identify your house's strengths and weaknesses, you may find ways to improve your residence before you list it.

Consider the buyer's perspective – you'll be glad you did. If you take an objective view of your residence, you may be able to identify assorted home problems and correct them right away.

Also, it may be beneficial to conduct a house inspection. Following an inspection, you'll receive a report that outlines any underlying problems with your house. You then can use this report to prioritize home repairs and upgrades.

2. Establish a Competitive Initial Asking Price

As a home seller, it is important to do everything you can to establish a competitive initial asking price for your residence. Thanks to a home appraisal, you can gain the insights you need to price your house appropriately.

During a home appraisal, a property expert will evaluate your home and various real estate market data. Next, this property expert will provide you with a property valuation. With this property valuation in hand, you can set an aggressive initial asking price for your house.

Maintain flexibility with your home price, too. And remember, if you upgrade your home before you list it, you may be able to receive multiple homebuying proposals at or above your residence's initial asking price.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

For those who want a helping hand throughout the house selling journey, it may be a good idea to hire a real estate agent. Because if you have a real estate agent at your side, you can receive comprehensive support at each stage of the home selling journey.

A real estate agent is happy to teach you about all aspects of the house selling journey and ensure you can plan accordingly. He or she can help you identify your house's strengths and weaknesses, price your home appropriately and much more. Plus, once you list your residence, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open house events to promote your property. And if you receive an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent will help you analyze this proposal and make an informed house selling decision.

If you want to take the guesswork out of selling your home, you should start preparing today. By taking advantage of the aforementioned tips, you can plan ahead for the house selling journey and set yourself up for a successful home selling experience.


It’s always a goal in life to be happier in our jobs and make more money. When it comes to buying a home, your job status can have a big effect on whether or not you’ll be able to buy a home or not. You will be able to buy a home using a new source of income. Even refinancing can be a breeze when you have a new job and the right knowledge. 


Many people believe that changing jobs or having gaps in between employment is a certain type of black hole when it comes to getting a mortgage. However, if you approach all of the changes in the correct way, you should be able to land the mortgage deal and secure a home.


Average Income


One of the most important numbers that your lender will calculate when you’re buying a home is that of your average income. This will be based on the pay that you had earned in the past 24 months‘ time. If you have had the same job and pay, this won’t be much of a big deal, However, if any of these things have changed (or will soon change) your lender may have some questions. This doesn’t mean that your mortgage application will be struck down completely. 


Information That’s Needed In The Event Of A Job Change


If you have recently changed jobs in the process of trying to refinance or buy a new home, your lender will need a few pieces of information from you. These items include:


  • An offer letter for the job
  • A role or title change letter (if applicable)
  • Compensation package change confirmation
  • Verification of employment
  • Most recent pay stub


Hourly Employees


If you’re an hourly employee, unfortunately, you’re under the tightest type of scrutiny when it comes to applying for a mortgage. Your income will be averaged for as long as you have been an hourly employee. If you work full-time, this won’t be too much of a problem. If your hours fluctuate from week-to-week, this can make things a bit more complicated.


If your hourly rates have recently gone up, you’ll need a bit of info from your employer to help you get the income verification that your lender needs. These items include:


  • An offer letter
  • Recent pay stubs
  • The new compensation structure or offer

If you have any sort of extenuating circumstances like a relocation or a new position, this information can help to bridge the gap in any information that just doesn’t add up as far as your employment history goes. 


Salaried Employees


If you’re a salaried employee, things are a bit simpler. Your lender will have a much easier time calculating your average income. The only issue that you may encounter is if you have had a gap in employment. For this, your lender will require a written explanation of what occurred during that time period.  

 

Lenders want to protect themselves, but in a way, they also want to protect you from getting in over your head with how much you can afford for a home. With some proof and a little explanation, you should be able to get a house you can afford if you have all of the information that you need to back up your financial history and employment history.


Looking to sell your condo? With assistance from a real estate agent, you can maximize the value of your property.

When it comes to selling a condo, hiring a real estate agent is a must. This housing market professional will set up condo showings, negotiate with condo buyers on your behalf and much more.

As a condo seller, it is important to do everything possible to get the best price for your property. And if you understand what it takes to find the right real estate agent, you may be able to streamline the condo selling journey.

Ultimately, there are many factors that condo sellers need to consider when they evaluate a real estate agent, including:

1. Condo Selling Experience

It is essential to hire a real estate agent who possesses condo selling experience. This housing market professional can take the guesswork out of selling a condo.

A real estate agent with condo selling experience will promote your residence to the right groups of property buyers. This will ensure your condo will stir up plenty of from interest from property buyers as soon as it becomes available.

Plus, a housing market professional can teach you about the real estate sector and help you plan accordingly. He or she will ensure you can avoid any potential hurdles as sell your condo too.

2. Communication Skills

Does a real estate agent go above and beyond the call of duty to stay in touch with condo sellers? If not, he or she may struggle to sell your condo.

A real estate agent should keep you informed at each stage of the condo selling journey. This housing market professional also should respond to your condo selling concerns and queries – without exception.

Perhaps most important, a real estate agent should be unafraid to be honest with you. With an honest real estate agent at your side, you can receive unbiased condo selling recommendations and make informed choices throughout the condo selling journey.

3. Client Referrals

How do past condo sellers rate a real estate agent? Ask a real estate agent for client referrals, and you can receive unparalleled insights into what it's like to work with this housing market professional.

Client referrals are great tools to help you decide whether a particular real estate agent is the best person to guide you along the condo selling journey. These referrals can provide you with insights into a real estate agent's professional demeanor and personality that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere. As a result, client referrals may prove to be exceedingly valuable to condo sellers.

If you need help selling a condo, allocate the necessary time and resources to hire a real estate agent – you'll be glad you did. Real estate agents are available nationwide and understand what it takes to sell a condo in any housing market. Therefore, working with a real estate agent may help you speed up the condo selling process and optimize the value of your property.


Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

A real estate investment trust (REIT) can be an attractive way to invest in real estate. It allows anyone to invest in real estate assets arranged in a portfolio. Currently, about 87 million Americans invest in these types of stocks.

What is a REIT? 

A REIT is a company that operates, finances and/or owns real estate that produces income. It provides its investors with the opportunity to own real estate so they can access an income that is dividend based. Investors in REITs also have a hand in enhancing communities by helping them grow and thrive. 

How a REIT Works

In addition to the fact that REITs are much like any other type of stock, they also tend to follow a methodical business model. The company leases space while collecting rent on the real estate it owns. The income generated by these actions is paid to shareholders.

In order to meet the qualifications for being a REIT, the company is required to pay out at least 90 percent of its taxable income to its shareholders. In many cases, REITs pay out a full 100 percent. Shareholders are required to pay income tax on their dividends. 

In contrast, mREITs (mortgage real estate investment trusts) don't own any real estate directly. They earn an income on the interest the is generated when they finance investments. 

Properties REITs Invest In

The types of real estate properties that a REIT can invest in spans a range of options. These are categorized into 13 different sectors and include residential, retail, healthcare, timberland and more. While most REITs invest in a single sector, there are those that hold more than one type of property. 

Types of REITs

There are four general types of REITs. The most common are equity REITs. These operate and/or own real estate that generates income. mREITs focus on providing financing for real estate by originating or purchasing mortgage-related products. 

Public non-listed REITs are registered with the SEC, but don't trade on the stock exchanges like the two previous types of REITs mentioned. Private REITs also do not trade on the stock exchanges. In addition, they are exempt from having to register with the SEC. 

Getting Started Investing in REITs

Investing in REITs is as easy as purchasing shares of a company that's listed on a stock exchange. Other options for investing in a REIT include buying shares in an exchange-traded fund or a mutual fund that focuses on REITs. Investors also have the option to invest in private REITs and REITs that are public but not listed on the stock exchanges. 

While REITs have historically outperformed a number of United States benchmarks, it's important to speak with an investment advisor or financial planner who can provide guidance and targeted information specific to your location and goals.


Photo by Lukas from Pexels

If you're ready to get serious about your home buying journey, one of the first steps is seeing various lenders. As you become more familiar with the process, you'll likely hear the terms preapproval and prequalified mentioned again and again. We'll look at how each letter works and what you should know before approaching a home seller. 

Prequalification Vs. Preapproval 

The key difference between a preapproval and prequalification is that the preapproval letter is much more involved. With a prequalification, the lender will look at the general state of the buyer's assets before estimating how much home they're likely to afford. Lenders are not diving into the buyer's past, which can make real estate agents wary of accepting prequalification letters. 

Preapproval 

With a preapproval letter, you're typically asked to provide the following:

  • Two year's worth of W2s
  • A month's worth of paystubs 
  • Two month's worth of bank statements 
  • Social security card 
  • Considering the amount of paperwork you need to provide (and the lender needs to process), preapproval letters can take months to generate. On the other hand, a prequalification letter can be procured in little more than 24 hours. 

    Additional Facts 

    Here are a few facts that can help you know more about what to expect:

  • Preapproval letters can cost several hundred dollars to generate. We recommend starting with your financial institution because you already have a relationship with them, and they may not charge as much. 
  • You may be able to lock down interest rates at the time of your preapproval letter. This is exceptionally helpful for those who want to know what their payments will be down to the penny. 
  • Make sure to calculate closing costs beforehand so you know exactly how much you'll owe out-of-pocket. 
  • Does It Help to Have Both?

    Not necessarily. Prequalification letters are generally recommended for homebuyers who may not know for sure if they're ready to buy. It's a general indication of how much money you'll get, which can help you decide if it's enough to get a preapproval letter. If you're in a buyer's market, you may be able to get away with a prequalification. However, it's generally the far less coveted letter that you can have. 

    A preapproval letter is definitely the best letter you can take to a seller when you're ready to make a bid on a home, but it's important to note that even these letters may fall through. For example, if a major event occurs (e.g., a job loss, etc.) between when your financial institution issued the letter and when you close on the home. Talking to a real estate agent or financial expert can make it easier to navigate it all. 




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